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5 Questions with Dr. Nancy Collins

        When a family friend was diagnosed with leukemia, a young Dr. Nancy Collins knew that she wanted to work in medicine to help people like him. This powerful experience led her to pursuing a degree in biology and then her PhD in microbiology and immunology in 1977 from the University of Rochester in New York. Since those days in the classroom, Dr. Collins has embraced her passion, focusing her research on the translation of cellular therapies from the research laboratory into clinical application, particularly in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Her laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center developed a number of methods to improve the safety and efficacy of hematopoietic cell transplantation and treatment of post-transplant complications, working with bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells, and cord blood cells. She was the visionary first president of ISCT, playing a pivotal role in the genesis of ISCT and the far-reaching global society it has become today. She was also a founding member of the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT), which was jointly instituted by ISCT and the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT). Over the years, Dr. Collins has inspired and mentored many up-and-coming cell and gene professionals, teaching at the University of Toledo as well as acting as the respected Senior Editor for ISCT's Telegraft newsletter.
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