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Introduction and overview

  • Massimo Dominici
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Massimo Dominici, MD, Division of Medical Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular Therapies, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Children & Adults, University Hospital of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo, 71 Modena, Italy.
    Affiliations
    Division of Medical Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular Therapies, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Children & Adults, University Hospital of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

    Technopole of Mirandola TPM, Mirandola, Modena, Italy
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  • Nan Zhang
    Affiliations
    Stem Cell Allotransplantation Section, Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • A. John Barrett
    Affiliations
    Stem Cell Allotransplantation Section, Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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Published:September 19, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcyt.2017.08.005
      Infectious diseases represent the single major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and in no other area of medicine has so much progress been made than in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. Over the past 100 years, major advances have included the widespread use of vaccines that have succeeded in eradicating diseases like smallpox, the development of antibiotics, and recent advances in antifungal and antiviral drugs. Despite these developments, the battle against infection has not diminished and the emergence of new macrobiotic strains, together with increasing mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, demands novel treatment approaches founded in a greater understanding of the pathological processes initiated by microorganisms. Cellular therapy takes its place among important new treatment approaches affecting either the immune system or in regenerating tissue damaged by infection. This special issue of Cytotherapy highlights some exciting developments using cell-based therapy to treat viral, bacterial, fungal and even protozoan infection that currently represent a significant burden on health care worldwide and lack satisfactory treatments.
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