Advertisement

Lymphocyte-nanoparticle biohybrids as a combined nanoimmunotherapy for cancer

  • R.A. Burga
    Affiliations
    George Washington University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Program for Cell Enhancement and Technologies for Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Search for articles by this author
  • J. Cano Mejia
    Affiliations
    Children's National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Search for articles by this author
  • C. Cruz
    Affiliations
    George Washington University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Program for Cell Enhancement and Technologies for Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Search for articles by this author
  • C. Bollard
    Affiliations
    George Washington University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Program for Cell Enhancement and Technologies for Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Search for articles by this author
  • R. Fernandes
    Affiliations
    George Washington University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, United States

    Children's National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Search for articles by this author
      T cell therapies have shown promise against leukemias, but little efficacy against solid tumors. Success is limited by an immunosuppressive tumor environment, which precludes effector cell accumulation at the tumor site or renders effector cells dysfunctional preventing tumor clearance. As such, strategies to improve effector cell function at the tumor site have the potential to enhance responses. We have observed that multifunctional nanoparticles can confer additional properties to existing cell-based immunotherapies including ablative heating, magnetic responsiveness, and localized drug delivery. We thus sought to evaluate whether immune cell-nanoparticle biohybrids (ImmunoNPs, Figure 1) could combine the potent cytotoxic capabilities of antigen-specific T cells and ablative therapy from nanoparticles to enhance immune responses within the suppressive tumor microenvironment.
      Figure 1
      Figure 1Schematic of immune cell-nanoparticle bionconjugates (ImmunoNPs).
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Cytotherapy
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect